Alternative Science: Does Water Have Memory?


Recently we have seen a lot many news reports pop up about scientists discovering the ability of water to retain information. This, they call Water Memory. However, many experiments and researches have been undertaken on the subject for quite some time now. In fact in 1988, Jacques Benveniste published a study for the same in Nature. But the controversial nature of the study meant that the report was accompanied with an editorial piece by Nature’s editor John Maddox, who urged readers to wait for the results to be replicated in subsequent researches.

Since then, many subsequent researches have been conducted by teams including the likes of US Department of Defense and BBC’s Horizon programme, but they were not able to replicate the results of Benveniste’s experiments in controlled conditions.

In 2011, results from another series of experiments conducted by the Aerospace Institute of the Univesity of Stuttgart in Germany were released. The experiments depict water’s ability to retain memory of different types of flowers immersed in it.

Again, in 2013 another team of researchers led by Dean Radin (Chief Scientist at IONS and Adjunct Faculty in Department of Psychology at Sonoma State University) conducted an experiment where water was shown to exhibit a change in physical structure, when distant intentions were focussed on it.

Abstract from the study:

An experiment tested the hypothesis that water exposed to distant intentions affects the aesthetic rating of ice crystals formed from that water. Over three days, 1,900 people in Austria and Germany focused their intentions towards water samples located inside an electromagnetically shielded room in California. Water samples located near the target water, but unknown to the people providing intentions, acted as ‘‘proximal’’ controls. Other samples located outside the shielded room acted as distant controls. Ice drops formed from samples of water in the different treatment conditions were photographed by a technician, each image was assessed for aesthetic beauty by over 2,500 independent judges, and the resulting data were analyzed, all by individuals blind with respect to the underlying treatment conditions. Results suggested that crystal images in the intentionally treated condition were rated as aesthetically more beautiful than proximal control crystals (p ¼ 0.03, one-tailed). This outcome replicates the results of an earlier pilot test.

(Read the complete study here)

Right from giving weight to practitioners of the homeopathy and other alternative medicinal practices, to being utilised in the search for life in the outer space, if the mainstream scientific community comes to an agreement in favour of the hypothesis, the implications could be huge.

Tell us what you think in comments below.


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