Meet Yoda Bat, Our Jedi Master’s Earthly Counterpart


Every once in a while, we come across real animals that resemble pokemons. But what if we told you there was a living, breathing species of fruit bats that resembles our favourite Jedi master from Star Wars? Meet the Yoda Bat!

Meet Yoda Bat, Our Jedi Master's Earthly Counterpart
via Wikimedia Commons/Alfokrads

This species of fruit bats has won millions of hearts with its smiley eyes and its uncanny resemblance to the infamous Yoda. 

Yoda bat is not the creature’s real name, of course, but that’s what the world has been calling it. In reality, the seemingly docile animal is called Hamamas, ‘happy’ tube-nosed fruit bat.

What does the Yoda bat look like?

The Yoda bat looks like it smiles eternally, thanks to its longer, broader jaw that grants it this appearance. The creature also has smiley, wicked eyes that truly make it seem cheerful and happy. 

Other than its happy-go-lucky charm, Yoda bat has beady eyes, a fuzzy chest and golden ears. 

When and where was our bat discovered?

Though the Yoda bat is widespread in parts of the Philippines, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and around Queensland, the first ‘discovery’ took place during an extensive conservative excursion between 1990 and 2009. The species was discovered in the rainforests of Papua New Guinea. Its scientific name is Nyctimene wrightae, but we don’t feel the need to learn it because, as far as we’re concerned, we have found the earthly counterpart of our Jedi master, and for us it will always be the Yoda bat. 

There are around 18 tube-nosed fruit bat species that have been discovered till now, but Yoda bat takes away the prize for the cutest one!

What else was discovered during this expedition?

Jedi master bat might be the most exciting discovery of this expedition due to obvious reasons, but a few other discoveries are worth mentioning. The researchers found a species of vampire fish(a fish with fangs), an interracial mouse(a mouse with a b&w tail), a katydid with bubblegum pink eyes, a, an orange range apider and a random 7m tall carnivorous plant 

RUN

According to 2021 statistics, we have named and identified only 1.64million species of animals and plants, out of the 8.7million gross total that have supposedly been discovered to date. This means that 81% of the species we know of haven’t been identified yet.

Who is to say, tomorrow we might find a real life buckbeak and take it for a spin. Oh wait, that’s already been discovered. 🙂

Don’t forget to check out these moth larvae. Spoiler: they look like skulls!


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