Kukka’s Chromarama Tapestries: Designs For The Colorblind


Upto eight percent of residents of the world have some or the other form of color vision deficiency, commonly known as color blindness. Though tech giants may, on some instances, roll out accessible features for this chunk of the population, like high contrast screen, the deficiency still remains unseen and not catered to. In a refreshing innovation in the world of design where colors perhaps matter the most, Kukka, a design studio, rolled out woven tapestries for those among us who have color blindness. The collection, known as Chromarama, can be experienced by those with or without color vision deficiency, and each tapestry will look different to those with different visual potencies. 

Kukka's Chromarama Tapestries: Designs
via Kukka Design on Instagram

With this project, founder Laura Lutchman aims to increase awareness about color blindness and the obstacles that are encountered by those who live with it. For Chromarama, Lutchman worked with a group of five color blind individuals and came up with pieces that cater to each time of CVD. 

How can we make the world of design more accessible? How can those with visual difficulties get access not only to functional design, but also to decorative design?

The tapestries are based on the principles of the infamous Ishihara color perception test, a small test book handed to those testing for color blindness. Each design boasts of patterns, lines and shapes that may change hue as they overlap. 

This creation has allowed colourblind people to have equal access to the work, even if some colors may appear different to them. As mentioned, each tapestry is unique and molded to cater to different kinds of CVD.

Chromarama I caters to red-green color vision deficiency, while the second piece in the series caters to both red-green and yellow-blue color weaknesses. 

The third and fourth design pieces are seen the same by people with and without color vision impairment. 

Many have asked why Lutchman chose weaving over other art and design forms for her project. The answer remains explicitly simple: the designer has been able to utilize different textures and yarn types, like shiny and matte, and this variety has allowed her to increase contrast, which remains an important part while making anything accessible to those with color vision deficiencies. 

“Even if you don’t know the story behind the tapestries, they are distinct and surprising designs that both people with and without a color vision impairment can enjoy”, Lutchman says.

Check out another project by Lutchman.


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